Can distracted driving lead to catastrophic injuries?

| May 14, 2021 | Motor Vehicle Accidents |

Whether on highways, city streets or county roads, California drivers face hazards during nearly every mile travelled. From distracted drivers to impaired drivers, serious motor vehicle collisions can lead to devastating injuries that could dramatically impact the rest of the victim’s life.

A brief look around while driving will show that distracted driving laws and government recommendations are followed to varying levels compliance. From that person who thinks it’s still okay to send a text with the phone hidden on his thigh to the person who is eating dinner on the drive home after a long day at work, California roads are still dangerous places to be.

Critical numbers on distracted driving

Statistics compiled from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and the California Office of Traffic Safety (OTS) present a frightening picture:

  • 9% of drivers surveyed in 2019 said they were hit or nearly hit by a driver who was talking or texting on a cell phone.
  • 51% of drivers surveyed in 2019 admitted they had made a mistake while participating in a cell phone conversation.
  • There were 3,166 motor vehicle collision fatalities across the United States in 2017.
  • Drivers who engage in an activity considered a manual or visual distraction are three times more likely to be involved in a motor vehicle collision.
  • Looking away from the road for five seconds while driving 55 mph means the car has traveled the length of a football field while the driver was essentially blindfolded.

Crashes caused by a distracted driver can result in catastrophic injuries and the devastating loss of life. Severe injuries such as brain damage, spinal cord trauma, amputation and paralysis can impact the victim and his or her entire family. These individuals will likely suffer lost wages, overwhelming medical debt and property damage. Without the help of an experienced personal injury attorney, a serious motor vehicle collision can lead to financial peril.

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